Person-Centred Care Training

Person-Centred Care Training Guide

Health and Social Care Course Guides

Care Learning

12 mins READ

Person-centred care is a holistic approach to health and social care that focuses on the individual. Developed from the theory of humanistic psychology and practice, this type of care emphasises the importance of the patient’s physical, emotional and spiritual needs. Person-centred care training can help equip medical professionals with the skills to provide the highest quality of patient care. This guide summarises person-centred care and explains how to apply the principles in practice. It also covers important topics such as the Health and Social Care Act, shared decision making, creating a person-centred care plan, record-keeping, and getting consent from patients.

What is person-centred care?

Person-centred care (PCC) is a holistic approach that puts patients’ needs and preferences at the centre of their care. It includes providing care that response to each patient’s physical, emotional, social and spiritual needs, as well as considering the values, beliefs and culture of the patient and their family.

Person-centred care is based on an understanding that all patients have unique needs and preferences. It seeks to understand and address these needs in a way that is meaningful to the patient. This includes providing care services that are tailored to the individual, making sure their input is respected and valued, and creating an environment that is supportive, compassionate and safe.

Person-centred care training helps healthcare professionals to become better at understanding and responding to their patients’ needs, preferences and goals. It covers topics such as how to engage in effective communication with patients and their families, how to create a safe and supportive environment, and how to develop and implement effective care plans.

Person-centred care training also helps healthcare professionals to understand the ethical implications of providing care and to become more competent in responding to challenging situations. The aim is to equip healthcare professionals with the knowledge and skills they need to provide better quality, more holistic care that is tailored to the needs of each patient.

Why is person-centred care important?

Person-centred care is a holistic approach to health and social care that focuses on the whole person, rather than an individual’s symptoms or condition. It is based on the belief that a person’s needs, feelings, abilities, and current life circumstances must be considered in order to provide effective care and support. Person-centred care takes the individual’s unique needs, preferences, and circumstances into consideration, providing a tailored and holistic approach to care.

The importance of person-centred care lies in its capacity to effectively treat a person’s physical, mental, and social needs. A person-centred approach allows care providers to address the individual’s needs holistically, enabling them to develop a plan of care that is tailored to the individual’s needs and circumstances. As a result, the individual receives individualised care that is tailored to their needs, enabling them to experience improved outcomes.

Research has shown that person-centred care provides many benefits to those in receipt of care, including improved wellbeing, fewer unplanned hospital and care home admissions, fewer re-admissions, improved quality of life and life satisfaction, and greater choice. Person-centred care has also been seen to improve communication between care providers and recipients, enabling them to build stronger and more meaningful relationships.

Person-centred care training is essential for any health and social care provider, as it equips them with the skills and knowledge necessary to provide care that is tailored to the individual’s needs, preferences, and circumstances. Person-centred care training taught by experienced professionals has been seen to significantly improve the quality of care and support provided, leading to better outcomes for the individual.

To conclude, person-centred care is an important approach to health and social care that is tailored to the individual’s needs, preferences, and circumstances. Person-centred care training is essential for any health and social care provider, as it equips them with the skills and knowledge needed to provide care that is both effective and respectful of the individual’s needs. By implementing person-centred care, health and social care providers can ensure that those in receipt of care receive the best possible outcomes and quality of life.

What are the principles of person-centred care?

Person-centred care is an approach to patient care that is based on principles of respect, dignity, and individualisation, and is focused on forming and maintaining meaningful relationships between healthcare professionals, patients, and their families. It is an important part of providing quality healthcare and has been proven to have positive impacts on patient outcomes and satisfaction. Person-centred care emphasises the importance of understanding an individual’s history, values and beliefs, feelings, abilities, and preferences when providing care.

There are five key principles of person-centred care, each of which is essential in delivering quality care in a way that is considerate of the individual’s needs and preferences. The five principles of person-centred care are:

  1. Respect and Dignity: Respect for the individual and the recognition of their unique values and beliefs is essential when providing person-centred care. Respect is shown by treating everyone with the same level of courtesy and understanding, and striving to provide culturally competent care.
  2. Compassion: Compassion and understanding are key aspects of person-centred care. This means taking time to be empathetic towards someone’s feelings and experiences and being aware of the difficulties they may be facing.
  3. Participation and Involvement: Person-centred care is all about involving the patient in their own care. This could be through deciding on a care plan together, or helping them understand their options and treatments.
  4. Information exchange: Open and honest communication is integral to the delivery of person-centred care. This means providing clear and accurate information to patients, listening to their questions, and ensuring that their involvement in their own care is respected and encouraged.
  5. Co-ordination of Care: Co-ordination of care is also an important aspect of person-centred care. This involves making sure that all the different healthcare professionals involved in a patient’s care are aware of each other’s role and contributions, and that everyone works together to achieve the best care for the individual.

Person-centred care is an approach that is based on respect, dignity, and individualisation, and is focused on forming and maintaining meaningful relationships between healthcare professionals, patients, and their families. It is an important part of providing quality care and has been proven to have positive impacts on patient outcomes and satisfaction. The five key principles of person-centred care are respect and dignity, compassion, participation and involvement, information exchange, and co-ordination of care. These principles are essential in delivering quality care in a way that is considerate of the individual’s needs and preferences.

What are the 6 Cs of person-centred care?

Person-centred care is an approach that focuses on the individual’s needs, experiences, preferences, and values. It is an essential component of successful health care delivery and is integral to the training of healthcare professionals. The 6 Cs of person-centred care are an important part of this training.

The 6 Cs of person-centred care are Compassion, Care, Competence, Communication, Courage and Commitment.

Compassion involves the ability to show kindness, sympathy and understanding of a person’s circumstances, regardless of their diagnosis or situation. This includes being aware of their physical, mental and emotional needs, and responding with empathy.

Care involves providing care that is based on a person’s wishes and preferences. It also involves being aware of any risks or safety concerns that apply to the person and their particular situation.

Competence involves having the skills and knowledge to provide the best possible care for the individual. It includes a wide range of knowledge and skills, including clinical knowledge and understanding of the larger context of care, such as an individual’s environment, culture, and lifestyle.

Communication refers to the ability to communicate effectively with an individual in order to elicit their needs and preferences, and to build a relationship of trust with them. This goes beyond just being able to provide medical information, but also being able to effectively listen to, and understand, a person’s needs.

Courage involves the ability to stand up for and fight for the rights of an individual, even when that might involve tough decisions or unpopular opinions. It also involves having the confidence to speak up for the person and advocate for them when necessary.

Finally, commitment involves being dedicated to providing the best possible care and service to the individual. This includes abiding by the principles of person-centred care and striving for excellence at all times.

Person-centred care is about providing care that is tailored to an individual’s unique needs, experiences, and preferences. By understanding and applying the 6 Cs of person-centred care, healthcare professionals can be sure that they are providing the highest quality of care to their patients.

What is the Health and Social Care Act?

The Health and Social Care Act 2008 established the statutory framework for how health and social care services are regulated in the United Kingdom. It sets out the legal duties and responsibilities of all those involved in delivering health and social care services, including healthcare providers, local authorities and the Care Quality Commission.

Under the Health and Social Care Act, healthcare providers must comply with the core standards and regulations set out by the Care Quality Commission. These standards cover areas such as infection prevention and control, safeguarding, consent, dignity and respect, complaints and whistleblowing. Person-centred care training is an essential part of ensuring that healthcare providers are meeting their statutory obligations under the Health and Social Care Act.

Person-centred care training helps staff understand the values, principles and standards of care required when providing care and support to individuals. It also helps staff understand how best to interact with and support individuals, how to develop and maintain relationships, and how to provide help and in a person-centred way.

Person-centred care training focuses on developing the skills and knowledge needed to work in a person-centred way. It encourages staff to understand how to promote and maintain the rights, wishes and needs of individuals and how to build trusting relationships with them. This type of training also helps staff to understand and respect the autonomy and privacy of individuals and how to use resources in a way that enables individuals to access the best care and support possible.

Person-centred care training is essential for all healthcare staff as it enables them to provide services that meet both their statutory obligations under the Health and Social Care Act and the wishes and needs of individuals. Ultimately, it enables healthcare providers to offer a higher quality of care that is tailored to meet the individual needs of each person they support.

How to apply person-care in practice

Person-centred care is an evidence-based approach to healthcare that puts the patient at the centre of treatment, recognising that everyone has unique needs and preferences. Person-centred care training enables healthcare staff to ensure that the care they provide meets the individual needs of their patients.

The best way to apply person-centred care in practice is to understand the principles behind it and how they can be used in everyday situations. Person-centred care is based on respect for a person’s autonomy, meaning that healthcare staff should always allow people to make their own decisions and choices. It is also based on understanding that people have unique needs and preferences and that this should be considered when providing treatment.

Besides understanding the principles of person-centred care, healthcare staff should also have an excellent knowledge of the key concepts involved. These include patient-centred decision-making, person-centred communication and collaboration, and self-advocacy.

Another important aspect of applying person-centred care in practice is learning how to involve patients in their own treatment. This could include actively listening to their preferences and opinions and involving them in the decision-making process. Healthcare staff should also be trained in how to communicate effectively and compassionately with patients so that they can be sure that their wishes are taken into consideration.

Finally, healthcare staff should be trained in how to develop a person-centred care plan that considers the individual needs and preferences of the patient. This could include creating an individualised treatment plan that is tailored to the patient’s specific needs and goals, as well as providing support for self-management and lifestyle changes.

Person-centred care training can equip healthcare staff with the skills and knowledge they need to apply person-centred care in practice. With the right training, healthcare professionals can ensure that their patients are receiving the best possible care, tailored to their individual needs.

How to use shared decision making

The aim of this section is to summarise how to use shared decision making as part of person-centred care training. Shared decision making is an important tool to ensure that all stakeholders are involved in the decision-making process and that each of their views is heard.

Person-centred care training should include activities to help trainees understand how to use shared decision making in the workplace. It is important to stress that each person’s opinion is valued and should be discussed openly. This could include activities such as role-playing, case studies, and group discussions.

It is important to ensure that every person is given a chance to express their opinion and contribute to the decision-making process. This can be done through formal brainstorming sessions, offering feedback on proposals and solutions, and encouraging team members to speak up. People should also be encouraged to listen to each other and think objectively before deciding.

When using shared decision making, it is important to ensure that all stakeholders are given sufficient time to consider their options and that the decision is made in an environment of mutual trust. It should also be noted that new ideas may arise during the process and should be discussed in an open and respectful manner.

Finally, it is essential to ensure that all decisions are well documented, and that everyone involved understands the implications of the decisions being made. As part of person-centred care training, trainees should learn to document their decisions and ensure that everyone understands the potential impacts of the decisions before any action is taken.

What are the four stages of shared decision making?

Shared decision making is a key aspect of person-centred care and an integral part of the training process. At the core of shared decision making is the concept of “shared responsibility”, where the patient and their care team are both actively involved in deciding. In order to facilitate an effective shared decision-making process, the four stages of shared decision-making need to be clearly understood.

The first stage is information gathering. During this phase, the healthcare provider gathers relevant information from the patient, such as medical history and current condition, in order to understand the patient’s needs and preferences. This step is important as it ensures that all relevant information is gathered and considered when deciding about the patient’s care.

The second stage is decision making. During this phase, the healthcare provider and the patient come together to identify the patient’s healthcare needs and the various treatment options available. The healthcare provider helps the patient to make an informed decision about the best course of action based on their individual needs and preferences.

The third stage is implementation. During this phase, the healthcare provider and the patient develop a care plan that takes into consideration the patient’s health and lifestyle needs. This step ensures that the patient receives the best possible care and treatment plan. The fourth and final stage is follow-up. During this phase, the healthcare provider evaluates the patient’s progress and makes adjustments to the care plan as needed.

Person-centred care training should include all four stages of the shared decision-making process. This ensures that the healthcare provider is properly equipped with the information and skills to collaborate with the patient in making decisions that consider the patient’s individual needs and preferences.

Creating a person-centred care plan

Person-centred care is a philosophy of patient care, which puts the person receiving care at the centre of all decision making. It is based on the individual’s needs and preferences, and puts them at the centre of their own healthcare. Person-centred care plans are essential tools in ensuring that the patient receives the care they need, when they need it, and in a way that best suits their individual needs and preferences.

Creating a person-centred care plan requires a team-based approach that involves the patient’s family, carers, and healthcare professionals. The plan should be tailored to the individual’s needs and preferences, and should be reviewed and updated regularly.

In order to create a successful person-centred care plan, it is important to involve the patient, their family, and healthcare professionals. This will help ensure that the plan is personalised and reflects the patient’s individual needs and preferences. It is also important to ensure that the plan is accessible and understandable to all stakeholders.

When creating a person-centred care plan, it is important to consider the patient’s physical, emotional, and social needs. This can include medical treatments and medication, but should also include lifestyle factors such as nutrition, exercise, sleep, leisure activities, and social support.

It is also important to consider the patient’s goals and preferences, and how these can be incorporated into the care plan. For example, if the patient has a specific goal, such as returning to work, this should be incorporated into the plan.

Finally, it is essential to review and update the care plan regularly to ensure that it remains in line with the patient’s changing needs and preferences. The plan should be discussed with the patient and their family or carers, and any necessary changes should be made.

Person-centred care training is essential in order to ensure that care plans are personalised and effective. Training should focus on developing and understanding person-centred care principles, as well as having a good understanding of the patient’s individual needs and preferences.

How to keep and store records securely

One of the important aspects of Person-Centred Care (PCC) training is learning how to securely store and keep records. These records should always be kept under the Data Protection Act of 1998 and other relevant legislation.

With storing records, there are a few important points to consider. For instance, anything stored electronically should be securely backed up. This is especially important if the record contains sensitive or confidential information. It is also important to ensure that the record storage system used is secure and regularly updated.

It is important to protect the privacy of any individual whose information is included in the records. Sensitive information should be kept secure and access should only be granted to those individuals who need it. In extraordinary circumstances where the information needs to be shared with third parties, the individual whose data is involved should be informed of this.

Before disposing of any records, it is essential to check that all the relevant legislation and regulations relating to data protection and information security have been complied with. Records should only be disposed of once they are no longer relevant or needed and should be disposed of safely.

With storing and keeping records, following good data protection practices is essential in order to ensure that the rights and privacy of the individuals involved are respected and maintained. In providing Person-Centred Care training, it is important that these issues are discussed and understood.

Acquire consent from patients

Gaining informed consent from a patient before beginning a person-centred care plan is an essential part of successful patient care. A person-centred care plan should be tailored to each individual patient, and gaining consent for this plan is a key element of providing quality care. Health care providers should ensure that an individual’s rights and values are respected, as well as meeting the goals of providing effective, patient-centred care.

In order to gain consent, health care providers must attempt to educate the patient on the person-centred care plan. Providers should be patient and take the time to explain what their care plan entails and why it is important to their health. They should also explain any potential risks or side effects that may occur. Providers should also make sure that they fully understand the patient’s concerns and take them into consideration when creating the person-centred care plan.

It is important for patients to be fully aware of their rights and to understand how their decisions and actions affect their care. Providers should involve the patient in decisions and solicit their feedback. This helps instil a sense of self-determination and encourages the patient to be an active participant in their care.

Finally, providers should ensure that all conversations with the patient are respectful and professional. Providers should be firmly committed to the patient’s wellbeing and their autonomy, and should take questions or requests the patient may have seriously.

By taking the steps to gain informed consent from a patient before beginning a person-centred care plan, health care providers can ensure that they are providing safe, effective patient care. Informed consent is a critical part of providing quality patient-centred care, and should always be a priority when creating a person-centred care plan.

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